You invoked the Web service with these parameters:

URL: Link
CodeSystem: 2.16.840.1.113883.6.96
Code: 313436004
Language: en
Response Type: application/javascript
Callback: Callback

The Web service returned the following data:

Title: MedlinePlus Connect
Subtitle: MedlinePlus Connect results for SNOMED CT 313436004
Author: U.S. National Library of Medicine
Author uri: https://www.nlm.nih.gov
Title: Diabetes Type 2
Link: https://medlineplus.gov/diabetestype2.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&utm_medium=service
Summary:

Also called: Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth.

You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having prediabetes also increases your risk. Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you may be able to delay or prevent developing it by making some lifestyle changes.

The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly. Some people do not notice symptoms at all. The symptoms can include

  • Being very thirsty
  • Urinating often
  • Feeling very hungry or tired
  • Losing weight without trying
  • Having sores that heal slowly
  • Having blurry eyesight

Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the A1C, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through healthy eating, physical activity, and blood glucose testing. Some people also need to take diabetes medicines.

NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

Title: Type 2 diabetes
Link: https://ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/type-2-diabetes
Summary: Type 2 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, the body stops using and making insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Specifically, insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells, where it is used as an energy source. When blood sugar levels are high (such as after a meal), the pancreas releases insulin to move the excess glucose into cells, which reduces the amount of glucose in the blood.Most people who develop type 2 diabetes first have insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's cells use insulin less efficiently than normal. As insulin resistance develops, more and more insulin is needed to keep blood sugar levels in the normal range. To keep up with the increasing need, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) make larger amounts of insulin. Over time, the beta cells become less able to respond to blood sugar changes, leading to an insulin shortage that prevents the body from reducing blood sugar levels effectively. Most people have some insulin resistance as they age, but inadequate exercise and excessive weight gain make it worse, greatly increasing the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes.Type 2 diabetes can occur at any age, but it most commonly begins in middle age or later. Signs and symptoms develop slowly over years. They include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or loss of feeling in the hands and feet (diabetic neuropathy), sores that do not heal well, and weight loss. If blood sugar levels are not controlled through medication or diet, type 2 diabetes can cause long-lasting (chronic) health problems including heart disease and stroke; nerve damage; and damage to the kidneys, eyes, and other parts of the body.

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					"_value": "<p class=\"NLMalsoCalled\">Also called:   Type 2 Diabetes</p><p><a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabetes.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">Diabetes</a> means your blood glucose, or <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/bloodsugar.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">blood sugar</a>, levels are too high.  With type 2 diabetes, the more common type, your body does not make or use insulin well. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood.  Over time, high blood glucose can lead to <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabetescomplications.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">serious problems</a> with your <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabeticheartdisease.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">heart</a>, <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabeticeyeproblems.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">eyes</a>, <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabetickidneyproblems.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">kidneys</a>, <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabeticnerveproblems.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">nerves</a>, and gums and teeth.</p><p>You have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes if you are older, have obesity, have a family history of diabetes, or do not exercise. Having <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/prediabetes.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">prediabetes</a> also increases your risk.  Prediabetes means that your blood sugar is higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. If you are at risk for type 2 diabetes, you may be able to delay or prevent developing it by making some <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/howtopreventdiabetes.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">lifestyle changes</a>.</p><p>The symptoms of type 2 diabetes appear slowly.  Some people do not notice symptoms at all.  The symptoms can include</p><ul><li>Being very thirsty</li><li>Urinating often</li><li>Feeling very hungry or tired</li><li>Losing weight without trying</li><li>Having sores that heal slowly</li><li>Having blurry eyesight</li></ul><p>Blood tests can show if you have diabetes. One type of test, the <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/a1c.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">A1C</a>, can also check on how you are managing your diabetes. Many people can manage their diabetes through <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabeticdiet.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">healthy eating</a>, physical activity, and blood glucose testing.  Some people also need to take <a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/diabetesmedicines.html?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">diabetes medicines</a>.</p><p class=\"NLMattribution\">   NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases</p> <p class=\"NLMrelatedLinks\"><ul><li><a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003640.htm?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">A1C test</a> (Medical Encyclopedia)</li><li><a href=\"https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/preventing-type-2-diabetes/50-ways\">Choose More than 50 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes</a> - NIH - Easy-to-Read (National Diabetes Education Program)</li><li><a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007429.htm?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">Diabetes type 2 - meal planning</a> (Medical Encyclopedia)</li><li><a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000660.htm?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">Giving an insulin injection</a> (Medical Encyclopedia)</li><li><a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000332.htm?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">High blood sugar</a> (Medical Encyclopedia)</li><li><a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000313.htm?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">Type 2 diabetes</a> (Medical Encyclopedia)</li><li><a href=\"https://medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000328.htm?utm_source=mplusconnect&amp;utm_medium=service\">Type 2 diabetes - self-care</a> (Medical Encyclopedia)</li></ul></p>",
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					"_value": "Type 2 diabetes is a disorder characterized by abnormally high blood sugar levels. In this form of diabetes, the body stops using and making insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas that helps regulate blood sugar levels. Specifically, insulin controls how much glucose (a type of sugar) is passed from the blood into cells, where it is used as an energy source. When blood sugar levels are high (such as after a meal), the pancreas releases insulin to move the excess glucose into cells, which reduces the amount of glucose in the blood.Most people who develop type 2 diabetes first have insulin resistance, a condition in which the body's cells use insulin less efficiently than normal. As insulin resistance develops, more and more insulin is needed to keep blood sugar levels in the normal range. To keep up with the increasing need, insulin-producing cells in the pancreas (called beta cells) make larger amounts of insulin. Over time, the beta cells become less able to respond to blood sugar changes, leading to an insulin shortage that prevents the body from reducing blood sugar levels effectively. Most people have some insulin resistance as they age, but inadequate exercise and excessive weight gain make it worse, greatly increasing the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes.Type 2 diabetes can occur at any age, but it most commonly begins in middle age or later. Signs and symptoms develop slowly over years. They include frequent urination (polyuria), excessive thirst (polydipsia), fatigue, blurred vision, tingling or loss of feeling in the hands and feet (diabetic neuropathy), sores that do not heal well, and weight loss. If blood sugar levels are not controlled through medication or diet, type 2 diabetes can cause long-lasting (chronic) health problems including heart disease and stroke; nerve damage; and damage to the kidneys, eyes, and other parts of the body.",
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